Think Like CDT: How to Protect Your Privacy

Linked by Paul Ciano

CDT:

Taking control of our personal data is often easier said than done. It can be overwhelming to think about how much data we generate each day, whether at work or just living our lives, and sharing some of this information is a non-negotiable part of modern life. Attempting to stop, let alone control this process, can feel daunting or hopeless, even for people in the privacy weeds.

It is a fool’s errand to come up with a standard set of tips for how best to protect your privacy. Even among people working at CDT, we each care about our privacy in different ways and manage our digital lives quite differently as a result. But in the spirit of Data Privacy Day, the staff at CDT wanted to offer a list of ideas for where to start, based on what we personally do to protect our privacy.

Pretty good list.

Injustice at the Border: How to Protect Your Data (Part 1)

If you follow this site, you most likely know that a large part of the content focuses on privacy and security. About 2 years ago, I said what I had to say on these subjects. From then on, I decided to simply continue linking to those who remained vigilant in these areas.

However, current events compel me to speak up once more.

Continue reading Injustice at the Border: How to Protect Your Data (Part 1)

Feeling Safer Online With Firefox

Linked by Paul Ciano

Good stuff.

Panos Astithas:

Firefox is the only browser that answers only to you, our users; so all of us who work on Firefox spend a lot of effort making your browsing experience more private and secure. We update Firefox every 6 weeks, and every new change ships to you as fast as we can make and verify it. For a few releases now, we have been landing bits and pieces of a broader set of privacy and security changes. This post will outline the big picture of all these changes.

macOS Security and Privacy Guide

Linked by Paul Ciano

drduh:

This is a collection of thoughts on securing a modern Apple Mac computer using macOS (formerly OS X) 10.12 “Sierra”, as well as steps to improving online privacy.

This guide is targeted to “power users” who wish to adopt enterprise-standard security, but is also suitable for novice users with an interest in improving their privacy and security on a Mac.

Five EFF Tools to Help You Protect Yourself Online

Linked by Paul Ciano

EFF:

Do you get creeped out when an ad eerily related to your recent Internet activity seems to follow you around the web? Do you ever wonder why you sometimes see a green lock with “https” in your address bar, and other times just plain “http”? EFF’s team of technologists and computer scientists can help. We engineer solutions to these problems of sneaky tracking, inconsistent encryption, and more. Our projects are released under free and open source licenses like the GNU General Public License or Creative Commons licenses, and we make them freely available to as many users as possible. Where users face threats to their free expression, privacy, and security online, EFF’s technology projects are there to defend them.

Good stuff.

The CIA Campaign to Steal Apple’s Secrets

Linked by Paul Ciano

Jeremy Scahill, Josh Begley:

Researchers working with the Central Intelligence Agency have conducted a multi-year, sustained effort to break the security of Apple’s iPhones and iPads, according to top-secret documents obtained by The Intercept. The security researchers presented their latest tactics and achievements at a secret annual gathering, called the “Jamboree,” where attendees discussed strategies for exploiting security flaws in household and commercial electronics. The conferences have spanned nearly a decade, with the first CIA-sponsored meeting taking place a year before the first iPhone was released.