The New and Improved Privacy Badger 2.0 Is Here

Linked by Paul Ciano

EFF:

With the 2.0 release, the Privacy Badger team remains as committed as ever to end non-consensual browser tracking and promote responsible advertising. Although Privacy Badger blocks many ads in practice, it is more a privacy tool than a strict ad blocker. Privacy Badger encourages advertisers to treat users respectfully and anonymously rather than follow the industry status quo of online tracking. It does this by unblocking content from domains that respect our Do Not Track policy, which states that the participating site will not retain any information about users who have expressed that they do not want to be tracked.

Do Not Track and Privacy Badger 2.0 are here to help you block stealthy online tracking and the exploitation of your browsing history. Download Privacy Badger now to take a stand against tracking and join the movement to build a more privacy-friendly web.

Internet Tracking Has Moved Beyond Cookies

Linked by Paul Ciano

Arvind Narayanan:

The reason that this is really important, and perhaps the primary thing that motivates me to do this research, is this world of pervasive surveillance that we’re entering into — and I’m going to use that word surveillance very deliberately, because it is surveillance. Everything that we look at online and click on is getting stored in a database somewhere. And it’s being data-mined and various [decisions] are being based on that. Targeted advertising is a relatively innocuous example, but there are a variety of other things that can and do happen.

There is research that shows that when people know they are being tracked and surveilled, they change their behavior. We lose our intellectual freedom. A variety of things we consider important for our civil liberties — say, marriage equality — are things that would have been stigmatized just a few decades ago. And the reason we got to the point where it was possible to talk about it and try to change our norms and rules is because people had the freedom to talk to each other privately. To find out that there are like-minded people. As we move to a digital world, are we losing those abilities or freedoms? That is the thing to me that is the question.

Moment, the iPhone App That Tracks Your Usage, Now Displays How Much Time You’re In Apps

Linked by Paul Ciano

This type of app is not my bag, but I know that some people love to track whatever they can about their computer usage. If that type of thing floats your boat, Moment might make your day.

Lifehacker:

Moment still displays how much time you spend on your phone overall and where you use it, but it can now show you which apps you use the most. iOS doesn’t allow access to this info automatically, but Moment cleverly gets around it using a screenshot you take manually each morning and optical character recognition.

Securing Firefox

Chrome is an awesome browser that has been lauded for its exemplary security model. However, as we have become painfully aware of, privacy and security are not equivalent. Traditionally, Mozilla’s Firefox has been a champion of users’ rights, but, by default, it is likely not the most secure browser.

Lately, there have been several, excellent resources geared towards hardening Firefox, and I want to condense and share what I have learned. Aside from making your browsing experience more secure and respectful of your privacy, you will see performance gains, as well.

I have been utilizing these customizations for several months, and have been very happy with the results. So, without further ado, let us get to it!

Continue reading Securing Firefox